Posts Tagged ‘service’

General Service Schedule

Tuesday, March 7th, 2017

Keeping your car up and running doesn’t involve much guesswork, unless you lost or don’t have an owner’s manual. Fortunately, there’s a general guide you can follow to keep your car properly serviced. Here’s a general service schedule from us here at Hassett Pre-Owned so you can keep your car running at peak performance.

 

General Service Schedule - Fluid

Weekly

Drivers would do well to check their windshield washer fluid and engine oil levels weekly, if not more often. Make sure all lights are working, including the dashboard indicator lights. Check tire inflation and condition too.

Three Months/3,000 Miles

Every three months or 3,000 miles, make sure to check the oil, engine air filter, power steering fluid, automatic transmission fluid, and windshield washer fluid. Inspect the battery, cables, belts, hoses, and exhaust as well.

General Service Schedule - Oil

Six Months/6,000 Miles

In addition to the previously listed items, drivers should check their chassis lubrication every six months or 6,000 miles. Make sure to change the oil at this point if you haven’t already.

12 Months/12,000 Miles

Most vehicles are engineered for minimal attention which is why most items can go unchecked for one year or 12,000 miles. Make sure to check the wheel alignments, steering, suspension, coolant, brakes, and wiper blades.

Over caring for your car won’t hurt, but neglecting general service can lead to disaster.

How to Repair a Car Dent

Tuesday, April 26th, 2016

Repair a Car DentRepairing a large car dent will require a trip to a repair shop like ours. But if the dent is very small, you can fix it yourself. With a few simple tools, you can fix dents on the cheap. Here are a few tried and true methods to repair a car dent.

  1. Specialty Kits – Probably one of the first things that catches your interest when researching how to fix a dent, specialty kits can be useful. While they have a shaky track record, most are relatively cheap which means you can still save money with a single purchase over a trip to the repair shop.
  2. Plunger – Arguably the most well-known method for removing dents, a sink plunger, also known as a cup plunger, will work on most small and medium-sized dents. Apply water to the plunger and the dent then push and pull. The suction will remove the dent.
  3. Hot Water – Plastic bumpers aren’t known for their flexibility and a dent can be hard to remove. To make popping the dent out easier, remove the bumper, pour boiling water on it, then push the dent out. The heat should make the plastic easier to maneuver.

How to Remove Scratches

Thursday, April 7th, 2016

How to Remove ScratchesCovering up scratches is easier said than done and specialty kits don’t always get the job done. While touchup paint is an option, it’s often noticeable, even from a distance. A blemish on your otherwise perfect car is no good, and if it’s a large scratch, you can bring it in to our service center. But if it’s something small, you can fix it yourself. Here’s how to remove scratches using things found at home.

Before you get started, check how deep your car’s scratches are by dragging your fingernail over them. If your nail gets caught, the scratch may be too deep to fix at home. Clean the scratches so there’s no dirt or grime around them otherwise it could get rubbed into your car’s paint.

Once you’re ready to get started, grab a tube of toothpaste and a damp, soft cloth. Add a few dabs of toothpaste to the cloth and rub each scratch in small circulation motions. Depending on the size of the scratches, the result could be immediate or you may need to keep rubbing for a few minutes.

To speed up the process, use a drill with a buffing attachment. To check if the scratches are gone, lift the cloth. Once they’re gone, you’re all done!

Four Fall Car Maintenance Tips

Wednesday, October 7th, 2015

Fall Car Maintenance TipsFall is finally here. That means that winter is just around the corner. Before winter’s worst comes to cause trouble for your car, there are certain measures you should take to prepare your vehicle for the nasty weather. Here are four fall car maintenance tips.

  1. Replace Old Windshield Wipers

Fall means falling leaves. Make sure that your windshield wipers are in top shape to brush those dead leaves away.

  1. Repair Your Defroster

Cold autumn mornings could mean a layer of frost covering your windows. If you don’t have a properly functioning defroster, it could take quite a while to scrape away all those layers of frost.

  1. Check Your Tires

Don’t wait until the roads are slick to check your tires. Take the preventative measure of checking them during the fall.

  1. Inspect Your Battery Life

Winter can be brutal during your battery. That’s why it’s important to make any needed repairs or adjustments before the weather gets too frightful.

How to Keep Your Car Cool

Wednesday, June 10th, 2015

Keep Your Car CoolThe summer heat comes around this time every year but it seems many people just aren’t ready for it. Climbing into a hot car after a long day at work is absolutely miserable. Thankfully, there are ways to keep your car cool and cool it off faster. Some of these ways may be obvious, but others are probably new for you. If your car just refuses to cool off, you should bring it in to our Service Center for a check up.

  • Shaded Parking/Sun Shades We know, these are the most obvious options and that’s why they’re first on this list. If you’re early for work, look around for a shaded parking spot under the shadow of a tree or building. Even if it’s a little further away from where you work, the tradeoff between a slightly longer walk (good for your health) and a cooler car is worth it. If you can’t find anywhere shaded, invest in sun shades. Not only do they help keep your car cool, they also protect the interior.
  • Bottom Vents Close the top vents, open the windows, and turn the air conditioning to its maximum setting. Since heat rises, the hot air will be pushed up and out of the car. Once cooled, close the windows and switch to the upper vents.
  • Fresh Air vs Recirculation When first entering your vehicle, set the air conditioning to bring in fresh air. Recirculation is best used to keep air moving when the desired temperature has already been reached. Switch to fresh air for the first five minutes or so, then switch to recirculation to drive comfortably.