Posts Tagged ‘tips’

How to Repair a Car Dent

Tuesday, April 26th, 2016

Repair a Car DentRepairing a large car dent will require a trip to a repair shop like ours. But if the dent is very small, you can fix it yourself. With a few simple tools, you can fix dents on the cheap. Here are a few tried and true methods to repair a car dent.

  1. Specialty Kits – Probably one of the first things that catches your interest when researching how to fix a dent, specialty kits can be useful. While they have a shaky track record, most are relatively cheap which means you can still save money with a single purchase over a trip to the repair shop.
  2. Plunger – Arguably the most well-known method for removing dents, a sink plunger, also known as a cup plunger, will work on most small and medium-sized dents. Apply water to the plunger and the dent then push and pull. The suction will remove the dent.
  3. Hot Water – Plastic bumpers aren’t known for their flexibility and a dent can be hard to remove. To make popping the dent out easier, remove the bumper, pour boiling water on it, then push the dent out. The heat should make the plastic easier to maneuver.

Winter Driving Tips

Friday, February 5th, 2016

Winter driving tipsDriving in the winter can be tough, especially when there is snow and ice on the road to deal with.  Here are some winter driving tips to keep you safe (and out on the road) during the season:

  1. Slow down – Seriously, there’s no rush. You should reduce your speed by 50% when driving on snowy roads, but it’s important to not go any slower than that because losing your momentum means you might get stuck.
  2. Loosen your grip – Clinging too tightly to the steering wheel can actually cause a loss of control. Keep a light touch on all of your controls.
  3. Know how to deal with skids – We all know how easy it is to skid when braking on icy roads. But the key is not to brake too hard, as this will lock your brakes up.  If you start to skid, turn gently towards the direction you want to go and don’t touch the brakes.

These simple tips will keep you safer on the road.  And if you’re a AAA member, they can help you out of a bad situation, too.  Here are even more tips from them.  Stay safe!

Tips for Driving in Winter Weather

Friday, November 20th, 2015

Driving in Winter WeatherDriving in winter weather isn’t desirable to anyone, let alone those traveling to see family. If you aren’t used to winter weather, we’d recommend you stay off the roads. That isn’t always possible, though, and winter can be harsh. To stay safe, remember these tips for driving in winter weater.

  1. Brake carefully. Start braking earlier than you would on dry roads. Slick roads won’t allow you to slow down as quickly and even the slightest error in timing can lead to a fender bender. Take the safe route and brake earlier than you think you need to.
  2. Avoid cruise control. Using cruise control is a convenient feature in the warmer parts of the year. In winter, it can lead to an accident. Assume all roads have slippery spots. Hitting your brakes to deactivate cruise control on one of these spots could easily lead to an accident or losing control of the vehicle.
  3. 4×4 isn’t invincible. For the most part, four-wheel-drive will give you the ability to get moving on winter roadways but it doesn’t mean you’ll be able to stop or keep your traction. You still need to take precautions, driving slowly and keeping a significant amount of space in between you and other drivers.

Teen Driving Tips to Keep Your Teen Safe on the Road

Friday, November 6th, 2015

Teen Driving TipsWhile we would all like to keep our teens safely locked inside for the remainder of their volatile teen years, the truth is, many new teen drivers will hit the roads this year. If you can’t lock your teen up, you might as well do the next-best thing, and educate them about the dangers they face as young drivers. Here are our top teen driving tips:

Obey speed limits. They aren’t there to rain on your parade, they’re there to keep you – and everyone around you – safe. Avoid a speeding ticket, or worse, and make sure to follow the posted speed limits.

Always wear your seatbelt. Always, always. It is the single most important safety system in your car (outside of your brakes) so use it! And make sure all of your passengers do, too. You’ll be held responsible for the people in your car who aren’t wearing seatbelts if you are pulled over or in an accident.

Reduce distractions. Many experts advise teens to wait until they have at least a year of driving under their belts before allowing other teen passengers to ride with them. Additionally, phones should always be tucked out of reach while on-the-go.

For more information, visit teendriving.com.

Four Fall Car Maintenance Tips

Wednesday, October 7th, 2015

Fall Car Maintenance TipsFall is finally here. That means that winter is just around the corner. Before winter’s worst comes to cause trouble for your car, there are certain measures you should take to prepare your vehicle for the nasty weather. Here are four fall car maintenance tips.

  1. Replace Old Windshield Wipers

Fall means falling leaves. Make sure that your windshield wipers are in top shape to brush those dead leaves away.

  1. Repair Your Defroster

Cold autumn mornings could mean a layer of frost covering your windows. If you don’t have a properly functioning defroster, it could take quite a while to scrape away all those layers of frost.

  1. Check Your Tires

Don’t wait until the roads are slick to check your tires. Take the preventative measure of checking them during the fall.

  1. Inspect Your Battery Life

Winter can be brutal during your battery. That’s why it’s important to make any needed repairs or adjustments before the weather gets too frightful.

Preparing Your Car for Fall

Monday, September 7th, 2015

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September has arrived, and that means fall is right around the corner. One of the best things you can do for the health of your car is be ready for big weather changes like a new season. If you plan on preparing your car for fall, here are some tips you should follow:

Check your car’s important systems. If you like to do a bit of home mechanic work, right as we’re going into fall is a great time to check your belts, hoses, fluids, antifreeze, and anything else that can be affected by warmer weather. Antifreeze can get diluted during summer, and winter is the most important time for antifreeze!

Get ready for snowy weather. This is also the time to add snow chains to your tires and switch out your summer car things with the things you need for colder months.

Prepare yourself for emergencies. You still need emergency food and water rations, but you also need blankets, an ice scraper, and warm clothes like gloves and an extra jacket. You might also want to keep some kind of ice melting spray to keep your windows clear!

Need help getting your car ready for fall? Our service department is here to help!

School Bus Safety Tips

Thursday, June 18th, 2015

School Bus Safety TipsIt might be the end of the school year (many schools have already called it quits for the year), but June just so happens to be Student Safety Month. In an effort to raise awareness for this important cause, we’ve come up with some basic (but important) bus-safety guidelines. As your children head off to camp, activities, or school this summer, make sure they heed these five rules.

  1. Parents should escort young children to the bus stop. Young children should be walked to the bus stop by a responsible adult. That adult should stay until the bus arrives, and someone should be there to escort the child home in the afternoon.
  2. Children should stand three giant steps away from the curb at all times. There should be no playing around at the bus stop, and kids should remain at least three large steps back from the curb where the bus will pull up.
  3. Wait for the bus to come to a complete stop. Before running up to the bus or getting off it, children should wait until the bus has come to a complete stop.
  4. Never walk around the backside of a bus. Children should always cross the street in front of the bus by first taking five giant steps in front of the bus; making eye contact with the driver; looking left, right, and left again; and then crossing.
  5. Never run on the bus. Children should never run on the bus, as their feet could easily become caught on a strap or other obstruction in the aisle. Additionally, they should always hold the handrails when going up and down the bus stairs.

Finally, as a driver, make sure you always go the posted speed limit in school zones, be extra attentive for wandering children, and stop whenever a bus is stopped—its lights flashing, stop sign out, or children getting on or off the bus (regardless of which direction you’re going). The law requires you stop and clear the road for children who need to cross.

For more information, visit safekids.org. We wish you a safe and fun-filled summer!

How to Keep Your Car Cool

Wednesday, June 10th, 2015

Keep Your Car CoolThe summer heat comes around this time every year but it seems many people just aren’t ready for it. Climbing into a hot car after a long day at work is absolutely miserable. Thankfully, there are ways to keep your car cool and cool it off faster. Some of these ways may be obvious, but others are probably new for you. If your car just refuses to cool off, you should bring it in to our Service Center for a check up.

  • Shaded Parking/Sun Shades We know, these are the most obvious options and that’s why they’re first on this list. If you’re early for work, look around for a shaded parking spot under the shadow of a tree or building. Even if it’s a little further away from where you work, the tradeoff between a slightly longer walk (good for your health) and a cooler car is worth it. If you can’t find anywhere shaded, invest in sun shades. Not only do they help keep your car cool, they also protect the interior.
  • Bottom Vents Close the top vents, open the windows, and turn the air conditioning to its maximum setting. Since heat rises, the hot air will be pushed up and out of the car. Once cooled, close the windows and switch to the upper vents.
  • Fresh Air vs Recirculation When first entering your vehicle, set the air conditioning to bring in fresh air. Recirculation is best used to keep air moving when the desired temperature has already been reached. Switch to fresh air for the first five minutes or so, then switch to recirculation to drive comfortably.

Automatic or Manual Transmission? Don’t Be Afraid to Stick Out

Friday, March 27th, 2015

automatic or manual transmissionEver considered driving a manual transmission car? In the US, only 6.5% of cars sold have been stick-shift, so the relative rarity may have some confused about the advantages to learning the process of getting your car in gear.

Aside from the thrill of weaving the stick through a gearbox on an open road while stomping on the clutch like Mario Andretti, there are some practical reasons to opt for a manual vehicle. One is that you have better control over the vehicle when you constantly control the gear of the car. This provides easy downshifting and engine-braking (and it’s not hard to learn).

One other factor is cost. Automatics tend to be slightly more expensive to buy and maintain and less efficient to operate. The reason is that a few more moving parts need to be installed, repaired, and require more engine power to operate. The total cost over the life of the car may add up to a few thousand dollars.

If you find yourself curious about a 6-speed manual Subaru, we at Hassett Automotive can show you the Outback, Legacy, Impreza, WRX, and Forester models that offer both automatic or manual transmission versions.

Tips to Spring Clean Your Car

Tuesday, March 3rd, 2015

spring clean your carThe clocks are springing forward and March is almost here; the warmer temperatures of spring are fluttering around the corner–hopefully! And what better way to usher in this new season than to de-winterize? Here are a few tips to spring clean your car.

  1. Focus on the inside. Clear out the trash that has accumulated, vacuum the Cheerios and other debris stuck to the mat, and scrub and/or power wash the sludge that seems to have effervesced into the unknown crevasses. Like Madonna circa 1984, it will feel shiny and new.
  2. Clean away that winter grime! Give your car a rinse and wash—especially focus on your car’s undercarriage, as it can tend to fall prey to corrosion from the salty roads. Clean the pesky “wash me” messages off of the windows, and remember to wipe down the car doorways—no more wondering where that black stain on your pants came from.
  3. Keep up with that upkeep! The white winter days are gone, and with it we usher in the rainy—but also sometimes sunny—days of spring. With that comes new duties for your car, so make sure it is equipped for the new season by checking the tread depth and air pressure of your tires, changing your oil, and adding washer fluid.

We at Hassett Automotive wish all of our readers a happy spring; be sure to come visit us and see our new line-up.